Oslo – A Breakdown Of A Fantastic Political Drama

When you think about theatre, you probably think of it as a place where you can go and watch drama and comedy plays. And that is normal as those two genres are the most prominent in the theatre.

Drama as a genre is perfect for the stage as actors can deliver excellent breath-taking performances that rely on dialogue rather than other aspects of the acting you usually see in other genres and on other platforms.

Political drama VS Historic political drama

Now, political drama is a variation of this style that takes on subjects that aren’t as defined as they should be. This includes everything from gay issue and racism to wars and other political matters. Political drama has a subject, and the actors are there to convey the ideas that lie behind it. It is like an argument where the goal isn’t to conclude but to deliver those arguments to viewers and let them decide who is right and who is wrong.

Political drama

The historical, political drama takes on critical historical moments and delivers them to the audience. For example, there is the Oslo, a masterfully written piece by the J.T. Rodgers, a contemporary writer of excellent political drama.

Oslo – The art of writing historical, political pieces

JT Rogersis known as a writer that takes moments that defined modern history and turns them in excellent drama plays. Oslo is his third take on historical moments, and it focuses on Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. The process of negotiations for peace was thought to be impossible, and that makes this play excellent.

The story follows a Norwegian sociologist and his wife and their efforts to organize peace talks. The play also covers the actual negotiation process and all the stress and drama that unfolded during those historical moments.

J.T. Rodgers knows how to approach a subject and that knowledge allows him to write characters that are believable and enthralling. The play is full of debates that delve deep into the issues that surrounded peace talks that were thought to be improbable and impossible.

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